Sample Lesson Plans

In this lesson, students engage in close readings with Milton's Paradise Lost and Cavendish's Blazing World. Students perform a free-writing activity, work collaboratively, and engage in group discussion to build and enhance their understanding of these two texts.

An important element of this lesson is that students also understand and demonstrate the ways in which shifting attitudes towards science, philosophy, history, and statecraft are reflected in the content and structure of Milton and Cavendish's works.

In this lesson, students become familiar with different critical concepts of ethics, including deontology, virtue ethics, and teleology. Using an example from J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, students analyze the behaviors of a character through the lenses of ethical schema.

In this lesson, students apply theoretical concepts from literary critical theory to a work of speculative fiction. An important element of this lesson is bridging the gap between philosophy and the "real" world.

In this lesson, students become familiar with different critical concepts of ethics, including deontology, virtue ethics, and teleology. Using an example from J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, students analyze the behaviors of a character through the lenses of ethical schema.

In this lesson, students

In this lesson, students apply their understanding of audience, rhetorical appeals, and rhetorical situation to create a research proposal for a competitive research funding opportunity.

A key element of this lesson is its insistence that students inhabit non-institutional roles. Students compose research proposals that mimic real-world situations in order to see the multiple applications of the genre.

2019 by Elizabeth D. Brissey

The beliefs and opinions expressed on this site are those of the author and are not affiliated with Auburn University

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